PARADISEC activity update

PARADISEC continues to grow! In the last year 63 new collections have been added and the archive has grown to 9.04TB with 12,489 items (made up of 73,496 files). We are currently reworking the catalog to make it easier to use.

We have added more items from Stephen Wurm’s (collection SAW4) and Don Laycock’s (DL2) papers.

Added collections include Gavan Breen’s written materials, transcripts and notes of vocabulary and grammar on 49 Australian languages and dialects, mainly from far north Queensland and the central Northern Territory (collections GB01-50). Almost all the languages described are now no longer spoken.

We were given a collection of 27 recordings made in Bougainville and the Western Solomons in 1964 and 1965 that have just been digitised (NC1). Also from the Solomons, we have accessioned Kazuko Obata’s (KO1) field recordings of Bilua.

Seven collections of ongoing work have also been contributed by researchers from the Languages of Southern New Guinea project – the first systematic investigation of the languages of the Southern New Guinea region, including Marori, Kanum, Yei, Nama, Nemne, Nen, Idi, and Tonda (collections LSNG01-7).

Recently, the notebooks of Ian Green and his field recordings of the Australian languages Maranunggu, Wadjiginy, Mullukmulluk, Madngele and Kamu have also been added to the archive and will be made publicly available once final editing is completed.

We are now working with Sally Nicholas to archive her materials in Cook Islands Māori and finalising work on tapes from the Solomon Islands National Museum.

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