Archive for the ‘Public Events’ Category.

Upcoming lecture: Payi Linda Ford – New ways for old ceremonies

Payi Linda Ford will deliver the Alfred Hook Lecture at 5pm on Wednesday 11 May 2016 at the Charles Perkins Centre Lecture Theatre, Building D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney NSW 2006

Continue reading ‘Upcoming lecture: Payi Linda Ford – New ways for old ceremonies’ »

Every hill got a story oral history just out

Every hill got a story: we grew up in country w51TVk4uaX0L._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_as launched this afternoon at Alice Springs Telegraph Station. A companion multimedia site is hosted by SBS Books. The substantial volume is sold by SBS Books and is also available on Kindle.

The volume by ‘men and women of central Australia and the Central Land Council’ is compiled and edited by Marg Bowman, carrying on from the late Jane Hodson, long term anchor of the CLC media section.

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Sunlight on IMLD 21 February 2014

Posters 'Language Walk' 21_2

A perfect blue sky and cool summer weather for Australia’s first International Mother Language Day (IMLD) 2014 walk. We walked from Reconcilation Place across the Kings Avenue Bridge to a Canberra park, where people sang, ate sausages, jumped on a bouncy castle, read poems in Bangla and Telugu, and generally had a good time. People from all sorts of backgrounds – Nigeria, Spain, Bangladesh, and Chris Bourke, ACT’s first Indigenous member of parliament.

This is the first time our heritage Indigenous and immigrant languages have been celebrated in this way, and it’s a great initiative of Canberra’s IMLD group.

Elsewhere in the world..

The Dhaka Times writes about the life and death of Rafiqul Islam, the man they say really pushed for the recognition of IMLD (Ekushey).

The Cherokee Nation honoured Cherokee translators who “work with technology companies, museums and universities to translate everything from documents to programs” and also a recent project to add Cherokee on Microsoft’s Office Online.

In Canada a private members bill has been introduced to get the government to recognise IMLD.

Sadly, in Iran Umid Niayesh reports: “
Tens of Iranian Azerbaijani cultural activists have been arrested in the city of Ahar in the East Azerbaijan province of Iran ahead of International Mother Language Day, the Association for the Defense of Azerbaijani Political Prisoners in Iran (ADAPP) reported on Feb. 20. The report has published names of some 60 arrested civil activists which were gathered in a home in Ahar.
Ebrahim Rashidi and Abbas Lesani who have been arrested several times due to their civil rights and mother language activities are among the arrested persons.”

And sadly in Kushtia in Bangladesh there was vandalisation of a Shaheed Minar monument built in memory of the mother language protesters whose deaths on 21 February 1952 led to this day being chosen for IMLD.

And to add to the gloom, back in Australia, we have the draft report
Review of Indigenous Education in the Northern Territory
. It is written by Bruce Wilson, director of a company ‘Education Business’. Major recommendations are that Indigenous students in the Northern Territory should be taught in English right from the start, and that for secondary schooling children from remote communities should go to boarding schools in the few big cities. The report does not tackle the fact that both strategies have been tried in the past, and have not worked. Munanga has posts detailing his concerns. You can send in a submission relating to this draft report. Submission deadline is 4.30 pm March 9.

But anyway, the couple of hours in the sunlight celebrating IMLD were great.

CALC (Central Australian Linguistic Circle) meeting

Central Australian Linguistic Circle (CALC) 2013 

Monday 9 September 2013, 8:30 am – 4:00 pm

Venue: Desert People’s Centre Function Room (next to the Irrarnte Café), Desert Knowledge Precinct, South Stuart Highway, Alice Springs

Map: http://desertpeoplescentre.org.au/contact-us/

Program:

8:30 am          meet at Desert People’s Centre Function Room, set up, introductions

9:00-9:30      Cathy Bow, Charles Darwin University The Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages

9:30-10:00    Margit Bowler, UCLA Majority Rules effects in Warlpiri vowel harmony

10:00-10:30  a session on educational linguistics and language-learning resources:

Susan Moore and Megan Wood, Department of Education and Childrens Services, The Australian Curriculum and Aboriginal languages

Michael LaFlamme, Publisher, Institute for Aboriginal Development Press, The Potential role of apps and picture dictionaries in language development

10:30-11:00        morning tea

11:00-11:30   Gavan Breen, IAD Dictionaries, Kaytetye and Warumungu

11:30-12:00   Margaret Carew, Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education, Iltyem-iltyem: a new resource for Central Australian Sign Languages

12:00-12:30   Samantha Disbray, Charles Darwin University, Bilingual education programs in central Australia: A broader evaluation

12:30- 1:30          lunch

1:30-2:00       Mary Laughren, University of Queensland, Polysemy or vagueness in some Warlpiri quantificational terms 

2:00-2:30       David Moore, University of Western Australia, Alyawarr Motion

2:30-3:00       David Nash, ANU and AIATSIS, Alternating generations again again

3:00-3:30         afternoon tea

3:30- 4:00      Myf Turpin, University of Queensland Verb-final word order in Alyawarr song-poetry

Morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea available from Irrarnte Café

Organiser: David Moore <moored03 AT bigpond.com>

Kalam Language Dictionary Launch

Check here for an account of the launch of the Kalam dictionary – what a feat! 48 years on..there’s hope for all of us with dictionaries in the bottom drawer.

And another new book and conference

Moving from Nigeria to Australia… We in Australia owe thanks to Maïa Ponsonnet, Loan Dao and Margit Bowler, who have shepherded the Proceedings of the 42th ALS Conference – 2011 to publication online on the ANU Research Repository in close to record time. Papers on lesser-known languages (old, new, created) include:

On Australian languages (old and new)
Taking to the airwaves. A strategy for language revival, by Rob Amery

Grammar rules, OK? What works when teaching a higly endangered Aboriginal language versus a strong language, by Mary-Anne Gale

Body-parts in Dalabon and Barunga Kriol: Matches and mismatches, by Maïa Ponsonnet

On created languages
I can haz language play: The construction of language and identity in LOLspeak, by Lauren Gawne and Jill Vaughan

The morphosyntax of a created language of the Philippines: Folk linguistic effects and the limits of relexification, by Piers Kelly

On other small languages
Simplifying a system: A story of language change in Lelepa, Vanuatu, by Sébastien Lacrampe

Non-referential actor indexing in Nehan, by John Olstad

The expression of potential event modality in the Papuan language of Koromu, by Carol Priestley

And language and music
Musicolinguistic artistry of niraval in Carnatic vocal music, by Mahesh Radhakrishnan

And the problems L1 speakers of Australian creoles face
Sad Stories. A preliminary study of NAPLAN practice texts analysing students’ second language linguistic resources and the effects of these on their written narratives, by Denise Angelo

Editing proceedings is an arduous task, but wonderful for the discipline – the world gets to see papers early, people are more inspired to go to the conference, and so there are more opportunities for fruitful collaboration: a virtuous cycle which repeats again at this year’s Australian Linguistics Society conference being held in Perth. Check out the presentations and abstracts – some fabulous-looking papers!

ELW podcasts

As part of Endangered Languages Week at SOAS some of our postgraduate students have prepared a series of podcasts about a range of topics that are now available from SOAS online radio.

They include Facts for newbies, an introduction to endangered languages and their study.

Launch of the Language Landscape website that describes a project to map unexpected languages in unexpected places.

Sand drawings of Vanuatu about a unique form of communicational art which represent physical objects as well as stories of the local population, and is listed by UNESCO as part of the intangible cultural heritage of humanity.

Palatography describes how linguists study the articulation of sounds and the inner workings of the mouth when speaking.

Have a listen to the various topics our students talk about.

Endangered Languages Week 2012


This year’s Endangered Languages Week will be held at SOAS from 3rd to 11th May 2012. The focus this year is on Language, Performance and Culture. There will be presentations of films, talks, and performances about endangered languages and cultures over the week.

Bob Holman, poet, film maker and co-director of the Endangered Language Alliance in New York City will present aspects of his work. Diaspora communities in London (including Sherpa, Kurdish and Maori singing groups) will also perform.

Open Day, with twelve exhibitors, will be held on 9th May 11am to 5pm in The Rausing Room (R201).

For more details of all the events check out the full programme of activities.

All events are free, so if you are in London over the next two weeks do come along.

Note: The poster photograph by PhD student Michael Franjieh comes from his extensive documentation of the sand drawing and narrative performance tradition of Ambrym Island, Vanuatu — Mike’s work, along with that of other students and researchers, will feature in the Exhibition that will run throughout Endangered Languages Week.

New Guinea Between the Wars

Michael Waterhouse will be presenting a talk on New Guinea between the wars at the State Library of NSW on 21st March based on his recently published book “Not a Poor Man’s Field. The New Guinea Goldfields to 1942 – An Australian Colonial History”. It will be accompanied by a film taken by his grandfather and one of his associates in the 1930s which documents the gold dredging and associated aviation activities at a time when New Guinea led the world in commercial aviation. There is also some ethnographic footage including what is most likely the first film footage ever taken on the Sepik River. This short segment in particular is in excellent condition. There’s also a segment showing several kukukuku (Anga) who’ve been arrested early in 1931 for murdering a miner and some of his carriers.

Details are at http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/events/events_talks/events/adventures_of_the_new_guinea_goldfields.html

Michael will be repeating the talk and film the following night (22 March) at Dymocks in the city. Details are at http://www.dymocks.com.au/LiteraryEvents/Default.aspx?s=1 [scroll down]

3L Summer School in Lyon, France, July 2012

The fourth International Summer School of the 3L Consortium (Lyon, London, Leiden) will be hosted by the LED-TDR team (Langues En Danger-Terrain, Documentation, Revitalisation), members of the DDL and ICAR laboratories (University Lumière-Lyon 2 and ENS Lyon, France), from 1st to 13 July 2012.

It follows on from the highly successful 3L Summer Schools in Lyon 2008, London 2009 and Leiden 2010.

The 2012 3L Summer School will concentrate on the theme of Endangered Languages Revitalisation. The main objective will be to create a space of reflection in an academic setting on the growing number of projects of revitalisation around the world. Based on an analysis of current and planned projects, it will promote a critical outlook on fieldwork in contexts of language revitalisation. The summer school includes lectures, courses and workshops, and thematic evening events, and sessions will be available in English, French and Spanish. It includes an International Conference on 6th and 7th July entitled: “1992-2012: twenty years of research on language endangerment” with the participation of international researchers, and of the main institutions involved in issues of language endangerment. There will also be a Junior Researchers Conference on 11th July for participants who wish to present their work from a critical perspective.

The website and registration form [.pdf] for the 3L Summer School is now available.

The deadline for registration is 31st March.